This week Dr. Correa is joined by Matt and Kanlaya Cauli, who share Kanlaya’s story of experiencing two massive strokes in May 2020 before being diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Matt describes his journey of learning to be Kanlaya’s caretaker and shares his advice for coping with mental health struggles and the challenges of being a primary caregiver. Dr. Correa then speaks with Dr. Olajide Williams, vascular neurologist at Columbia University and founder of Hip-Hop Public Health. Dr. Williams explains the different types of stroke and the condition’s prevalence in younger individuals.

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Episode Transcript

Dr. Correa:
Saludos and hello, I'm Daniel Correa.

Dr. Nath:
And I'm Audrey Nath.

Dr. Correa:
We're two neurologists and fellow brain geeks hosting the Brain and Life podcast. This show, the Brain and Life magazine, and website are all brought to you by the American Academy of Neurology.

Dr. Nath:
We're so glad you're joining us. We'll be here each week for conversations and interviews with community members, celebrities, and experts on brain health and living with neurologic conditions. Now let's get to today's show.

Dr. Correa:
So next I'll be talking to Matt and Kanlaya Cauli. I wanted to give you a little bit of background. A friend of mine sent me a video through TikTok about Matt and Kanlaya's story. Now Matt has become the caregiver for his 37 year old wife after she suffered a major stroke and had something called a hemicraniectomy. He's been there, the two of them loving and smiling together, but at the same time, putting on a brave face and keeping everyone happy and healthy and moving forward in his family, while at the same time inside having to deal with all the changes that have occurred. Now, this story is both heartwarming and challenging, and I think it's an important one for all of us to hear.

Dr. Nath:
You know, I got to say, as you told that story, I feel so thankful that my parents and my husband's parents have not had strokes. I also think about, they say in sickness and in health, right? And what my husband and I would do for each other if we needed to. And it's just, it's big. So I really look forward to hearing this interview and hear about how they're doing it.

Dr. Correa:
For people dealing with many neurologic conditions and disabilities to really get a chance to spend time and to see them. And I think that's really the kind of example that we get from Matt and Kanlaya and their relationship as they've been dealing with this stroke.

Dr. Correa:
Hello and welcome back to the Brain and Life podcast. I'm really excited to introduce you guys today to Matthew and Kanlaya Cauli. So Matt and Kanlaya's worlds were flipped upside down when his wife Kanlaya, who's here with us, suffered a massive stroke in May 2020 during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York. We were all dealing with a lot of things, but these two really had a lot more challenges introduced to their lives during the time. Kanlaya had a second stroke on the right side of her brain, which caused weakness on her left side and then required a craniotomy surgery to decompress swelling on her brain. Matt and his family has used TikTok and social media to reach a large worldwide audience with over 4.5 million views to help other people learn about their story, to share his wife's road to recovery, the complexity of her care and treatments, and his own journey, love, and dedication as her husband and caregiver. Matt and Kanlaya, thank you so much for joining us today.

Matt Cauli:
Oh yes. Thank you for having us.

Dr. Correa:
Now, I'd like to start by hearing a little bit more about each of you and your own stories before all this, maybe even before you two met.

Matt Cauli:
I'll start out with myself. So I just grew up in a small town in Connecticut, Danbury. Later went to college in Massachusetts where I graduated, and then I worked in the city for quite a long time, and that's when we met. Our first date was at Grand Central, and we went to Central Park. And then for Kanlaya, she was from Thailand. She came over on a student visa. So she was here, and she was an au pair with a family. I met her online. She was in Westchester. So we met in the city, and her visa was expiring after we dated for a year and a half. So I had to make a decision, and I knew it was a very easy decision. She was the one. So I proposed to her, keeping her here in the states. And that was the beginning of the story. And then from there we were married for, oh gosh, I better get this right, 11 years now?

Kanlaya Cauli:
It's going to be 12, we married in 2010.

Matt Cauli:
Twelve, that's right. So we lived in the city for a little bit. Then we both moved to Rye, New York for a few years. And then we got a place in Westchester for the past six years where we have a five year old son right now as well. And that's kind of where we've been. And our dog, Bella.

Dr. Correa:
Well, it's an international and modern love story that you two had an opportunity to meet online, cross many barriers to be together and to share in your family. So, what happened in May 2020 that made you seek medical care with Kanlaya?

Matt Cauli:
So I guess, let me start off with Kanlaya was a young mom, right? So she had our son. And after that, obviously being a young mom, fatigue was always an issue, but there were a couple things that happened leading up to that day in May. She would get random, swollen joints, which we thought was lyme.

Kanlaya Cauli:
On my arm and my knee, the big one from my knee that I have to, I went to see doctor about that.

Matt Cauli:
Right. So we went in and out of the doctors, not as much as we should have. We really didn't think anything of it because we're young, and we're always tired. You got a little one, it's of course you're going to be fatigued. And then they thought maybe it was lyme. So she got tested for lyme, that wasn't it. Fast forward to that day, May 15th, 2020. I believe she complained of a minor headache that day. And it was lunchtime. And I looked at her on the couch, and she was in a very abnormal position. Obviously something was very wrong.

Kanlaya Cauli:
Yeah, I was sitting on the couch, I think after I had something to eat, and we sit on the couch watching TV and then play on my phone. And then I feel like I can't really grip my phone, keep falling off my hand, and then I can't really grab it back with my left. So it's already weakened.

Matt Cauli:
Right. So that started to happen. That's when I asked her, are you hungry? Do you want something to eat? And I turned back around. I was like, that's weird. I wonder what she's doing? And then all of a sudden a hot wheels car hit my shoulder, and I turned back around and that's when I knew something was very wrong.

Kanlaya Cauli:
But I did that. I tried to get you.

Matt Cauli:
Yeah. You tried to get my attention, which she did. So 911, myself, and my son were obviously in a panic. The ambulance came. They took her to the Northern Westchester Hospital, which was the closest hospital. They administered, and doctor correct me if I'm wrong, but is it TPA?

Dr. Correa:
That's right, yeah.

Matt Cauli:
TPA. It was within that four hour timeframe, but unfortunately it didn't do what it was supposed to do. So she got rushed to Phelps Memorial Hospital where a procedure is done, where they go up in your leg, one of your main arteries that go up into the brain, and they were able to do that. And they unclotted it. Unfortunately two days later as she was recovering it clotted again, but even bigger. It was even more massive of a stroke. Her team felt there's nothing we could do. We don't want to go in, we don't want a chance hemorrhaging or bleeding or anything along those lines.

Matt Cauli:
So unfortunately they just had to, I guess, ride it out, you could say. With that, there was also a chance for the brain to swell, which of course in our situation happened, it was swelling so much. It was pushing against the brain that they had to do the craniotomy, and I believe what they told me was the brain would swell so much that it would compress on the neck. And maybe sever the spine or something to do with the spine, and that's why they needed to do the craniotomy to relieve that pressure. And again, she was 34 at the time. So the brain is very different in a 34 year old compared to a 60, 70 year old.

Dr. Correa:
So you had a lot to possibly injure, and that swelling can cause injury in lots of different places. What was your experience with the craniotomy or that procedure where they take off the bone flap to give the room space? What was your experience talking with the doctors about that and thinking about it? I imagine it is brain surgery, so it must have been scary and intimidating to think about.

Matt Cauli:
Obviously when talking about the brain, it's very scary. I didn't know what to expect, but at that point, I'm do what you have to do. And after that surgery, one of those days she was in the ICU, she was complaining about her abdomen. So they did a scan and long story short, they found a mass in her stomach area about 10 centimeters large.

Matt Cauli:
So, she was in such rough shape they weren't able to go in and test it and see what it was, but fast forward to the Lennox Hill, it turned out to be ovarian cancer. And it was a cancer called clear cell carcinoma, a very rare cancer, but it was known to clot the blood. So that was the culprit. I know for Kanlaya, we spoke about it a lot. You would think you would know if something 10 centimeters was in your abdomen, but she had no idea. They did a full hysterectomy among many other things that we battled during that. And yes, you're right, it was all happening at the height of COVID. So it was a very tough experience to be in.

Dr. Correa:
I'm wondering, I know for sometime during COVID at least at many hospitals, including ours, there were sometimes the families couldn't be in there, and sometimes they could only come for an hour or two or small amounts of time. Was your son able to visit? How was that experience? Because it's very different from what I think other people experience in intensive care units or when their family members having surgery.

Matt Cauli:
Yeah, that was one of the toughest aspects of everything was, was not being able to be with her in the beginning a couple of days. One of the nights we were FaceTiming, I noticed something way off with her, and I said, "Doctor, there's something off. She doesn't seem right." And long story short, she was having her second stroke. And that was the frustrating thing is I know her better than anyone in there, and she's an unfamiliar territory, being from a different country as well, must have been very scary for her. So long story short is I had to knock on some doors and plead my case, and they were kind enough to let me in. But everybody at the hospital was, was very helpful and supportive and they would allow me to come in for an hour or two when she was in the ICU.

Matt Cauli:
And then she got moved to a different room, and I was able to visit a lot more often, which is much needed with a recovering stroke patient. They needed to see familiar faces, and she needed a lot of explaining to do in layman's terms, which I can do.

Dr. Correa:
And Matt, I understand it's been quite a struggle. That was all sort of part of the process of being in the hospital. And then you talked about, she got diagnosed with the ovarian cancer, had the surgery. I think actually we didn't get to touch on, so after they diagnosed the ovarian cancer and found it, what was the next step that they did to try to work on the cancer side of things now?

Matt Cauli:
Right, so there were a week or two where they couldn't test it or see what this mass was. So it was always, it might be cancer. It might be just a fatty tumor or something that we don't have to worry about. But we needed to wait for the craniotomy surgery to heal a little more before she got sent down to get the full hysterectomy and find out what this mass in her abdomen was.

Matt Cauli:
So the full hysterectomy happened, and then the doctor called me and said, yep, it was cancer, but it's at stage 2B. Obviously, she knew it was cancer, but then later on, they staged at 2B, which is weird to say, but kind of a win. This whole experience has been so weird in the sense that these strokes that happen almost saved her life in a way. It helped detect the cancer somewhat at an early fightable stage. So, could have done with maybe just one and not two strokes. That would be nice. But long story short is she's still here. She came home, and then she was at a good point where she could go in and she started chemo a couple months after being discharged from the hospital. So she was doing chemo and rehab at the same time, which is pretty amazing to see her go through all of that.

Dr. Correa:
So you both have made your way through many medical and rehab and recovery struggles. And Matt, I understand it's been also quite a struggle throughout the process that you've been working two jobs to support both your wife and your now five year old son, Ty. Beyond the financial struggles, what other challenges have you experienced along this way?

Matt Cauli:
Oh gosh, my mental health has really taken a toll. I was always one that was always strong, but this kind of broke me down. I always leaned on Kanlaya. She was the smartest. Everything was 50/50. We both helped each other out with everything, and then now after this stroke, it's all on my shoulders. We're at the point now where she can help out with some chores around the house, we're getting there slowly but surely, things are being lessened stress wise on myself. And I always leaned on her for support, and it's tough not to have that support as much anymore, but it's coming back.

Matt Cauli:
And then another very difficult aspect is obviously my son and the impact of all this has on him. So far, he's been I think pretty good. You just don't know what's going on underneath the hood, but he seems well. And before the stroke con Kanlaya and him did everything together. And then to go from that to mommy in the hospital for almost three months, it was tough. I had to be her. I had to be with him.

Dr. Correa:
What were some things along the way? You had so much to contend with, between the finances, the COVID struggles and isolation, and all of the challenges that you were each going through, what were some things that helped you even for just short periods of time or at all to cope and manage with it?

Matt Cauli:
It's going to sound really silly, but work. I just tried to take on as much work as possible. Work was almost a therapy to me, which not a lot of people can understand that. Especially my parents, like they're "you need to let lighten the load." But it's when I would work, it was almost like an outlet.

Dr. Correa:
Well work, it gives you discreet tasks and things that you can control and complete. It probably all felt much more manageable than the bigger scope of everything else that was going on for you.

Matt Cauli:
It was kind of an escape from the doctor's appointments, the rehab appointments, the whole laundry list of things that needed to be done daily.

Dr. Correa:
And you talked some about Ty's experience throughout the process. He's basically growing up with so many changes for both of you and for the family. What are some things that you think has helped him learn and adapt to what's going on?

Matt Cauli:
I just try to keep him as active as possible. Don't know if it was the right thing or wrong thing, but he grew up really fast during this whole process.

Dr. Correa:
Yeah, totally.

Matt Cauli:
And I didn't know what else to do except be truthful with him. I didn't know how to spin it any other way. So I think he appreciated the truthfulness in everything. I think that helped. It got us this far, and he seems to be doing just fine.

Dr. Correa:
It sounds like it has. And it's good for, I think, many kids to have some clarity in a sense they're participating in mommy getting better and knowing what's going on instead of so much going on in the world and it's all being hidden, and they're just given toys and a video game.

Matt Cauli:
Yeah.

Dr. Correa:
So I'm just wondering, Matt. So if you could go back there in the room, whether it was the ER or the intensive care unit or waiting in the operating room, what message would you have for yourself on those early days in 2020?

Matt Cauli:
Great question. I thought about this a lot. I wish I would tell myself it's never going to get back to the way it was. You got to come to terms with that and just, that's just what it is, but you will get to a point where you will make it work. The problem was, is at that time, nobody had a magic eight ball. Had no idea where we would end up. No idea. Don't even know if I could communicate with her or not, like we do today. Had no idea. But if I knew where we would end up, I would've told myself to just hang in there. Like I said, with time, you'll get to a point where you're better. Like I said, you'll never be, both of us will never be the people who we were before, and it's weird. I feel like I'm living two different lives. One before this stroke, and then one after. We're both different people from where we were before.

Dr. Correa:
Yeah, I think in all of our relationships, we have to choose to grow together. We change no matter what. You guys have just gone on a fast forward and went through a lot of things together.

Matt Cauli:
Yeah, if anything, it brought us closer.

Dr. Correa:
And Kanlaya, what would you say to another patient who's had a massive stroke and has had so much change in their life? Maybe they're in the hospital or in the ICU thinking about their life and their world now, after having such a big stroke and now all so many changes.

Kanlaya Cauli:
I want to tell them that things will get better.

Dr. Correa:
That's sobering to hear that. It's taken a lot of time and a lot of therapy and your energy, but where you're at now, you look back, this is a hopeful place.

Matt Cauli:
I mean, luckily Kanlaya had something that I think a lot of people unfortunately might not have, but she's a young mom. And I think the fact she wanted to get back to being with her son, gave her something to fight for. And I would remind her of that every day, and I'd show her pictures of Ty as much as I can to just say, do it for him, just do it for him.

Dr. Correa:
Yeah, I think it's important for all of us to have purpose, but that much more when something changes and challenges every fiber of how you defined yourself and things that you did in your past. And Matt, anything that you think is important for other caregivers of someone living and recovering after stroke to keep in mind about how they can be there for their family member or loved one?

Matt Cauli:
Find an escape, five minutes a day, just something that you can just unwind, whether it be looking on TikTok or something that doesn't require work, but just to kind of escape for a little bit. And I hear it all the time from other caregivers, it is rewarding in a sense, you do pat yourself on the back every night saying, wow, I'm getting us through this. We're going to get through this.

Dr. Correa:
And for each of you, what is something positive in the future or now that you're looking forward to?

Matt Cauli:
I'm looking forward to going to Disney with our family, and now that Kanlaya is much stronger now, I feel like that would be a great place to go. I'm glad Ty still has his mom looking forward to the school things, the plays, all those things, sports, all those fun things for him. And we get to watch him grow up together.

Dr. Correa:
Thank you guys very much. It's the love, dedication, and the resilience of caregivers like Matt, and the smile and joy that Kanlaya brings to life that inspires us all. I thank you both for taking the time to be here with us today.

Matt Cauli:
Thank you, doctor. Thank you so much.

Dr. Correa:
And Matt, where can people find some more information about yours and Kanlaya's story? And if they're interested in taking a look, how they can support you and other people living with these conditions?

Matt Cauli:
That's great. So casesmile.com has a quick overview of our story, but mainly our story is on TikTok. It was really the only outlet I had at the time to use for support. So everything is listed on our profile in TikTok, which is @MJCauli.

Dr. Correa:
Great, and thank you. And listeners, we will include the links and more information about Matt and Kanlaya in our show notes, and we'll also share some photos and video content as you're taking a look and following us on social media. Thank you all for joining us, and we'll look forward to following up this with our discussion with our medical expert.

Dr. Nath:
Don't let the conversation stop here.

Dr. Correa:
Follow us at Brain and Life Mag on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for more helpful information to keep up on the latest brain health tips.

Dr. Nath:
Join us online to keep connected with the Brain and Life community by following @brainandlifemag on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Dr. Correa:
And connect with us. Your host on Twitter @NeuroDrCorrea, that's D R C O R R E A.

Dr. Nath:
And @AudreyNathMDPhD.

Dr. Correa:
Welcome back. That was a powerful story for Matt and Kanlaya about the impact of stroke on their life. Now we have Dr. Olajide Williams. He is a vascular neurologist and tenured professor of neurology at Columbia University and a global leader in health disparities and behavior change and communities of color. A key part of his public health efforts in the US has been the Hip Hop Public Health Program. Founded in 2008, the Hip Hop Public Health Program by Dr. Williams promotes health literacy through hip hop, short animated features, and health video games. This has included health education about stroke, obesity, cancer COVID-19, and even the COVID-19 vaccine more recently. Working together in collaboration with artists, such as Doug E. Fresh, Chuck D and DMC. Thank you, Dr. Williams for taking the time to connect with us here on the Brain and Life podcast.

Dr. Williams:
Hi Daniel. Thank you. It's really an honor and a pleasure to be here.

Dr. Correa:
So Matt and Kanlaya shared with us their story that where their lives changed when Kanlaya suffered a massive stroke in May of 2019, during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic here in New York. Kanlaya herself suffered what they described as a malignant MCA or middle cerebral artery infarct. Can you help us understand what they mean by this description of malignant MCA infarct?

Dr. Williams:
And so in simplistic terms, there are generally two types of stroke, and I'm borrowing a description from one of my fifth grade kids at our hip hop stroke schools. These children describe two types of stroke, a wet stroke, which is the hemorrhagic stroke, which is when blood vessels burst or aneurysms burst and there's bleeding in the brain. And dry strokes, which is the ischemic stroke or the type of infarction that you're alluding to. And so an infarct is a type of dry stroke, which is caused by blockage of a blood vessel and not the rupture of the blood vessel. But these dry strokes are devastating and are actually the most common type of stroke. And there are times when the blood vessel is blocked near its terminal branches, which really limits the size of the stroke because the territory that those terminal branches are responsible for are much smaller in size and volume than the territory, those large, early branches, the trunk of the vessels, are responsible for.

Dr. Williams:
And so the blockage happens to occur at the beginning of these large vessels, at the branching points, the early beginning, proximal branching points of these large vessels, the territory that they're responsible for are huge, humongous areas in the brain.

Dr. Williams:
And the middle cerebral artery, or the MCA, is one of those major vessels that has multiple branching points in the brain, supplying smaller and smaller areas. And if that middle cerebral artery is blocked approximately at the beginning of its journey, then that entire area of the brain, including all of its distant branching points are at risk. This is a large, giant life-threatening stroke. To the extent that when it occurs, it can cause such dramatic swelling in the brain that it can cause very rapid deterioration and death through a process called herniation. And this massive swelling that occurs in response to these infracts, these large blockages at the beginning of these large blood vessels, this massive swelling of the life threatening nature of these types of stroke is why we refer to them as malignant.

Dr. Correa:
So due to the swelling from the stroke that she had, they talked to her and her husband about the possibility of a craniotomy surgery. How do you talk with individuals and families who have to consider this type of intervention for this swelling?

Dr. Williams:
It's a difficult conversation because of two things. One is that the decision must be made quickly. Unlike other very serious decisions in medicine where families have time to process things, to consult with others, to really take the time that they need to make those decisions. The type of decisions that's required in this setting is one that has to be made quickly because every minute that the patient's swelling is allowed to continue for is a step closer to death for that individual.

Dr. Williams:
And so it's a difficult conversation to have, but it's a conversation that we need to make sure that we present the pros and the cons of the decision within the context of the individual's wishes and desires. Some people have clear instructions in their living will that they do not want to have any type of major surgery. Some people have instructions that they do not want to live with any form of disability that a stroke of this magnitude can cause.

Dr. Williams:
And so it's important for us to first respect the autonomy of the patient and their families to make the decisions based on what those desires are for their futures. And once that's been established, which is the first thing we do is to first ascertain whether the individual would want a procedure of this magnitude. And if the answer is yes, we want you to go ahead and perform this procedure, then we explain what the procedure is. And in this situation, it involves removing a piece of bone from the skull to allow the brain to swell outwards through the hole that we created rather than being crushed against the inner table of the skull.

Dr. Williams:
What happens if the brain is swelling, and it's being crushed against the inner table of the skull, there's only one place the brain swelling can go since it cannot burst the skull open, what it does, it swells downwards through the hole at the base of the skull, through which the spinal cords reside. And it swells downwards into that hole in a process that we call herniation, and that if it's allowed to continue causes death. So by opening up half of the skull, or a large part of the skull on the side in which the swelling is maximum, we are allowing the brain to swell skull free in that area that has the ability to save the individual's life. It doesn't reverse the damage from the stroke. Only acute treatments can do that, but it will preserve life and help aid survival of the patient.

Dr. Correa:
So it might sound like a very like major and barbaric surgery, but really we're doing it in the situation where someone has such a condition that they may actually have swelling and progressed to not being able to survive that stroke. It's really a life-saving procedure.

Dr. Williams:
Yes, it's a life-saving procedure.

Dr. Correa:
Now speaking to the indiscriminate nature of stroke, as we said, Kanlaya had this at a young age. So she had this big workup and all these extra tests and eventually a CT scan found an ovarian mass that was identified to be a clear cell carcinoma. Oddly, this stroke allowed them to catch it earlier before it caused more complications. But in younger individuals who suffer a stroke, what are all the tests that you consider to help them and help you find the possible cause of the stroke?

Dr. Williams:
That's a great question. The first thing I want to say is that young individuals are developing adult chronic diseases at younger ages. So we're seeing a rise in hypertension levels among young people. We're seeing a rise in diabetes level among young people. And a lot of this has been driven by the obesity crisis that has really spiraled out of control in this country. And so the first thing I want to say is that young people are at increasing higher risk for stroke because of the increasing prevalence and incidents of these preventable conditions like diabetes, like high blood pressure in young people. So the first thing is to establish whether this young individual has any of what we call traditional stroke risk factors. Are they as heavy smokers? Do they have uncontrolled hypertension? Do they have uncontrolled diabetes? And it's important to establish this as these risk profiles as a first stage.

Dr. Williams:
At the secondary level, a lot of young people might not have any of these conditions, and we start now looking for secondary conditions for their stroke. And that includes looking very carefully at their heart to see if they have any large holes in their heart, to look at their heart rhythm, to see if they there's any irregularity to their heart rhythms, to even look at their heart valves, to see if there are any valvular problems in their valves, and to look at their just general state of their heart function. Because even with what we've seen in with certain viruses, including COVID, that you can have a myocarditis of the heart, which can affect its ability to pump blood efficiently, and that in turn can cause pooling of blood in the heart and the formation of blood clots in the heart. So a thorough cardiac evaluation is another critical step when we're looking at young people with strokes.

Dr. Williams:
And then the third thing is to also look at what we call hematological causes of strokes. So looking at the patient's blood to make sure you really screen for any causes for a tendency to form blood clots. There's certain conditions, some are genetic, that increase an individual's propensity or tendency to cause spontaneous blood clots. And these spontaneous blood clots can go north and block blood vessels and cause the type of strokes that we're talking about. So a thorough screen of the blood to look at all the, what we call coagulation factors, and all the blood factors that might increase the risk of the tendency of that individual's blood to form clots. And then the final level is to really recognize that there is a relationship between cancer and stroke, and certain cancers can increase your risk for stroke by through a mechanism that we refer to as cancer associated vasculopathy.

Dr. Williams:
So these cancers cause what we call increased viscosity, increased thickness and stasis within the blood. And sometimes we see this with certain types of breast cancer. Sometimes we see it with certain times of lung cancer, and we can also see it with certain kinds of ovarian cancer and renal cancers and adeno cancers in general. And so it's also important after going through this, a systematic approach, to evaluating a young person with stroke. Sometimes, and unfortunately, we might end up with one of these cancers as the cause of that individual stroke.

Dr. Correa:
That's really helpful. And I think really an important description for people to hear because sometimes people come in with a much more mild stroke and they're wondering what's taking so long and they feel like they should just be able to go home. Or some people have more severe strokes, and they're in the hospital for a lot of things, and they're focused on more about the movement and their recovery, but there is this careful, systematic process that we work through. And that takes time for us to help understand why they had the stroke and what we can do to prevent it. And Matt and Kanlaya really were so open and shared so much about how they've been coping and living with it and how Kanlaya finds a way to smile throughout. Thank you, Olajide, for taking the time, Dr. Olajide Williams works here in New York City at Columbia Presbyterian and as a stroke neurologist and take a look at his initiatives with Hip Hop Public Health and any opportunity to engage with it in your community. Thank you again for taking the time today.

Dr. Williams:
Thanks, Daniel.

Dr. Correa:
We're going to be including Dr. Williams and more information about the Hip Hop Public Health initiative in upcoming episodes. So please follow us on your podcast platform, subscribe to the episodes, and stay tuned as we talk more with specialists about neurologic conditions and about things that affect our lives.

Dr. Correa:
Thank you for joining us today on the Brain and Life podcast. Follow and subscribe to this podcast so you don't miss our weekly episode. You can also sign up to receive the Brain and Life magazine for free at brainandlife.org.

Dr. Nath:
Also, for each episode, you can find out how to connect with us and our guests along with great resources in the show notes. You can also reach out by email at BLpodcast@brainandlife.org.

Dr. Correa:
Follow me, and Audrey and the Brain and Life magazine on your preferred social media channels.

Dr. Nath:
Special thanks to the Brain and Life team, including:

Dr. Correa:
Nicole Lussier, our Public Engagement Program Manager.

Dr. Nath:
The amazing Clayton Stansberry, our Digital Media Production Editor.

Dr. Correa:
And Andrea Weiss, our Executive Editor for Education and News Publications.

Dr. Nath:
We are your hosts.

Dr. Correa:
Daniel Correa joining you from New York City and online @NeuroDrCorrea.

Dr. Nath:
And Audrey Nath beaming in from Texas and on Twitter @AudreyNathMDPhD.

Dr. Correa:
Thank you to our community members that trust us with their health and everyone living with neurologic conditions. We hope together we can take steps to better brain health and each thrive with our own abilities every day.

Dr. Nath:
Follow and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr. Correa:
We really appreciate it if you can give us five stars and leave a review.

Dr. Nath:
Thank you.

Dr. Correa:
This helps others find the Brain and Life podcast.

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